While I wait to get home, home finds me here

I am so amazed and truly inspired by all the people who read my blog yesterday and left such thoughtful comments. Like many of you I am feeling quite helpless as the days drag on and my proposed departure date is further behind me. It is really comforting for me to share my knowledge and try an help, while I am so far away from my patients in Australia, who keep getting moved to new appointment times.

Yesterday I wrote about the importance of keeping your health and safety as key priorities. That includes your mental health. Mindfulness is key here; if ever there is a time to be extremely vigilant about remaining in the present, it is now. Constant distractions and worries about home will only hamper our efforts to stay calm and we all need to be calm.

Once again, I need to impress upon anybody working in customer service and trying to assist us;

We don’t really want to call you or make your day any more stressful than it is. In fact, we would rather leave you alone, but we need to do so as the delays drag on and we search for certainty to combat feelings of despair. So please understand from our point of view that if you continue to provide consistent, clear messages and update when you promise, we will feel reassured and take ourselves out of the queue of calls waiting for you.

If you are experiencing an exacerbation in anxiety or your mood is affected adversely, remember to do what ever you can to stay calm. That may mean avoiding busy places that you may be visiting in order to kill time, or use WiFi. Sensory overload may not be helping inner anxieties, once again check in with your own anxiety and see how much you can withstand. Consider it a finite, valuable resource.

If you have run out of medication or are experiencing symptoms of a relapse of mental illness, it may be a good idea to try and call your GP at home. Although they may not be able to assist you as comprehensively as a visit to a doctor in Bali, you may be able to get some basic advice, and they may be able to reassure you. Likewise, your pharmacist at home may be able to help out. I would imagine that the local hospitals and GP clinics in Bali will currently be overflowing with requests for repeat prescriptions and treatment of acute physical and mental symptoms. I would imagine that they cannot cope too well with the huge demand, and my heart goes out to the doctors and nurses trying to help. If you are already anxious, an extended wait in a crowded emergency department may make things worse. Having said that, if you are feeling unsafe or acutely unwell, you must attend there for care.

So, from a psychiatrist’s perspective, here are some things you can do to boost your mental health reserves. they are not a substitute for specific medical advice, but they might help;

  • Use psychological and behavioural strategies such as distraction and relaxation techniques. Believe me, they work. Anything that can bring baseline levels of anxiety or depression to a more manageable state should be your first priority.
  • Exercise is extremely therapeutic. Nature walks are much better than trying to walk along crowded roads. Walk along the shore and feel the water on your feet. Cover up, and focus on your breathing. Leave the FitBit behind (I drowned mine in the pool, oops) this is not about steps or fitness. It is about the very beneficial mental health benefits of exercise. Walk as slow as you need to and as far as you need to until you notice your thoughts calm down.
  • Try and only focus on real concerns immediately affecting you, not the ‘what if’s’. Believe me, I have a huge list of ‘what if’s’, as a mother with a son back home in Oz that I was meant to get home to 4 days ago. This is what I am doing, you may find it useful as well.
    • Pull out a piece of paper and pen. Place all of your most important concerns in a column down the left hand side.
    • On the right hand side, allocate each concern to somebody to manage. You may be able to delegate some tasks related to home to someone at home. It will seem better when you notice that a lot of the tasks, such as getting someone to water the garden, pick up the pets, check the mail, contact your employer for updates, cancel or postpone appointments waiting for you can actually done by one person at home in a short space of time.
    • Authorise someone at home to speak on your behalf and this may cut down on your need to call from Indonesia. The time you free up can then be used to work on your relaxation strategies. And seeing a list with items ticked off is extremely therapeutic.
  • For all your fears, worries, what if’s, try visualisation work. Every time an anxious irrational fear pops into your mind, rather that fight or ignore it, put it somewhere – visually. Whether it be in a suitcase or an elaborate parcel made with banana leaves and decorated with frangipanis… you get the idea. Use your imagination to take the heat or the fear out of the worry. Let the worry know you have acknowledged it, but it is not that useful right now, so you will put it away for later. If you fight it, it will get louder and scare you more. The more you feel in control of your worries, the less they can hurt you.
  • If you are looking for medication substitutes, I would strongly advise against purchasing herbal preparations, or products with ingredients you don’t recognise. Any preparation, ‘natural’ or not has the capacity to interfere with your prescribed medication, and may cause a whole new set of symptoms. Avoid health related discussions on chat rooms,  or calling on Dr Google. If you are really desperate, once again a call to your pharmacist in Australia may help, if they have a list of ALL your medications, not just psychiatry medications.
  • It may be tempting to pass the day away with a few extra cocktails, under the proviso that you ‘deserve’ them. I am not trying to be a party pooper here, but if you already feel anxious or depressed, a big night on the Bintangs will make everything a whole lot worse tomorrow. And tomorrow might be the day you get that call you can fly home, so you need to be prepared to cope with a crowded airport, different route home, different airline (breathe, visualise….). Everything in moderation. Including social media.

I’ll endeavor to write daily whilst I am stranded here, and when I get home. Notice I say ‘when’ not ‘if’. Make a conscious decision to only say things to yourself that help you feel grounded, calm, and ready for whatever tomorrow may bring.

Best wishes,

Helen

Dr Helen Schultz has found herself stranded in Bali after booking a well-needed holiday, and writing her first book, How Shrinks Think. She is now spending her time practicing what she writes about, and writing. At any other time, she would consider this her dream life. 

 

 

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